Browser plugin: Readable.

Often when browsing the internet, I bump into websites that look like this:

Preamble



The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for software and other kinds of works. The licenses for most software and other practical works are designed to take away your freedom to share and change the works. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free software for all its users. We, the Free Software Foundation, use the GNU General Public License for most of our software; it applies also to any other work released this way by its authors. You can apply it to your programs, too.

When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs, and that you know you can do these things. To protect your rights, we need to prevent others from denying you these rights or asking you to surrender the rights. Therefore, you have certain responsibilities if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it: responsibilities to respect the freedom of others.

I tend to favor wider screens, which means that I have to physically turn my head to read these older/non-css websites if I’m browsing in fullscreen. To solve this, I used to open the dev tools and manually insert CSS.

Eventually that got tiring, so I built a small browser extension to automate the process. I’ve been using it for a few years, and recently decided to upload it (after some cleanup) in case anyone else would find it useful.

It applies some basic CSS to the current window, making websites like the example above turn into this:

Preamble



The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for software and other kinds of works. The licenses for most software and other practical works are designed to take away your freedom to share and change the works. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program–to make sure it remains free software for all its users. We, the Free Software Foundation, use the GNU General Public License for most of our software; it applies also to any other work released this way by its authors. You can apply it to your programs, too.

When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs, and that you know you can do these things. To protect your rights, we need to prevent others from denying you these rights or asking you to surrender the rights. Therefore, you have certain responsibilities if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it: responsibilities to respect the freedom of others.

Which I find a lot easier to read.

If you’d want to use it yourself , here’s how to get it:

Installing on Brave/Chrome.

  1. Clone Readable into any folder.
  2. Browser -> Extensions -> Manage extensions -> Load unpacked.
  3. Browser -> Extensions -> Readable -> Pin (optional).

Using it.

  1. Click the ‘R’ icon.
  2. Click ‘MAKE READABLE’.

I’ve only tested it on Brave and Chrome, so I am unsure whether it works on other browsers (it uses the Chrome API). Feel free to modify as you wish.

Cheers!